Monday, March 2, 2015

Ikea Hack: Console Table



When Kenny and I moved into our apartment, I spent a few months hunting for small console tables for several of our rooms.  I found a few inexpensive tables, but I couldn't find anything narrow enough for our bedroom. I wanted the table to be opposite our bed, so I only had about two and a half feet of space to work with, which meant I needed a really narrow table.


The sad state of affairs, pre-console table. 

And I wasn't interested in shelling out $100 or more for some custom table from Etsy. I'm just not at that stage of my life. (And I probably never will be. Let's be honest.) Instead, I scrounged around for various things that I could fashion into a table. In the end, I built this handy little console table for $67. And I'm pretty proud of it. If only because I had to use a power tool.

First, I found a $6.99 Ikea EKBY shelf made from unfinished pine. The shelf is only 11" deep, so it was at the outer limit of how large I wanted a table to be. BUT, it was the right price, and I though it could still work.
EKBY TRYGGVE Shelf IKEA Solid wood; can be cut to desired width.
Then I picked up four SJUNNE nickel legs from Ikea, which were a little above my ideal price, but at $15.00 each they were still cheaper than a brand new table.

SJUNNE Leg IKEA The table can be moved across the floor without worry because the plastic feet protect against scratching.
Then, we bought a power drill, because we didn't own one. But you probably do. And if you don't, hey! You can find a really cheap one at Ikea!

The screws that came with the legs were too long for the shelf - they would have would have gone right through the table top. So I picked up some shorter, 1/2 inch screws from Home Depot for $2.

When we got home, I laid everything out on the carpet (because I don't need a garage!) and stood the legs upside down on the wooden shelf.

I placed each leg 5.75 inches from the table's end and 1 cm from the front (or back) of the table. I also made sure the legs were parallel to the front edge of the table and ~2.25 inches from the other table leg. Once all the legs were in place, I used a pencil to trace the leg bases and the screw holes. This way, I could set aside the unattached legs without losing my measurements.















Bonus Tip: I do recommend screwing the screws into the board rather than out of the board. This is a lesson I learned only after ten minutes of incredible frustration and confusion.

And, voila! A table you have.  I'm hoping to seal this once the weather is warm enough to work outside. But for now the unfinished pine is doing just fine.

Before:


After:






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2 comments:

  1. Great job on the table! I love simple designs. It really seems to match the room with its minimalist look.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! I generally tend toward a more traditional look, but my husband is a big fan of light wood and minimalist design. The next hurdle is to talk him into hanging pictures! :)

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